Category: Dharmaprayaya

Oneness – The Homecoming


17498524_1491666897532824_2734617113503196927_n

The photograph shows the front and back of a red packet of the Avatamsaka Monastery in Taiwan and in Canada. The four Chinese characters at the front reads: Shower All with Magnificent Auspices and Peace and below those words is the Great Seal of the Avatamsaka Monastery, which transliterates as Da Hua Yen Si; the back shows the monastery’s conceptual logo and below the logo are five Chinese characters which reads from left to right: This is the Most Auspicious Abode.

The two larger Chinese characters right below also reads from left to right: Huayen, which means Flower Ornament or Adorn with Flowers.

Below the Chinese characters are our tag line: Huayen-world and The Homecoming.

The Avatamsaka Garden group on Facebook was created on the 24th of February 2017. Let us add the numbers 2+4+2+2+1+7 that make up our date; we get the number 9, which is the highest in a decimal numbering system. If you add 1 more to 9 it falls back to 1 because 0 means naught which is nothing.

Now at this moment and this moment only because it will change before you know it, let us look at the number of members we have now, the number reads 1180, which by reduction becomes 1.

Now you look at the number of new member at this very moment, we have 108 new members, which number is reduced to 9, the highest number.

When the number 1 encounters the number 9, it always return to 1.

This is proof that The Homecoming to this Garden of Life is indeed the Most Auspicious Abode because no matter where we come from,  no matter what religion or language we speak, as long as we are here in the Garden, we are One. We are one and the same. We are one with one another. We are one with God. We are one with the universal primordial energy. We are one with our original Buddha nature. We are one with the Tathāgata.

We should all be very proud that we are together in this Garden of Life!

Click here to visit the Garden of Life, the Most Auspicious Abode.

Our Avatamsaka Dhyāna View of the Sentient World


Avalokiteshvara yidam

禪觀有情世界
在日常生活中體驗諸行無常
在起心動念中覺證諸法無我
在一息尚存中成就涅槃寂靜
在法界遷流中了悟緣起性空
Our Avatamsaka Dhyāna View of This Sentient World
Experience the Impermanence of all actions in our everyday life.
Wake up to the fact that all thoughts and intentions are void of substance.
Be one with and listen to the harmonious unstruck sound of silence of Om in Nirvana before you breathe out your last and final breath of life.
In the never ending shifts and flows of the Dharma realms wake up and come to the inner-standing and realisation that the original nature of all causes and conditions is substantively void.
From your humble gardener Venerable Sakya M. Longyen

A State and Act of Contemplation


‘Kuan’ is both a State and Act of Contemplation

The word ‘kuan’ as used in Chinese Ch’an practice and in esoteric practice carries different meanings respectively.

In Ch’an practices, it is a noun, meaning a realized state of contemplation manifested after a practitioner has eliminated all his illusions through the practice of vipassana or Ch’an. Such a state can be manifested as heterodox or orthodox, or as imperfect or perfect. The practitioner must then follow the guidance of his guru, carefully compare his realized state with what is written and taught in the sutras, and adhere to what is orthodox and perfect so as to enter the state of samadhi in real life.

In esoteric practices, however, the word ‘kuan’ refers to an act of immersing oneself in a physical and mental state so as to achieve contemplated reality. The practitioner puts himself in real life situations to carry out such an acts of contemplation according to esoterics. Thus esoteric Buddhism emphasizes ‘kuan’, both in action and at rest.

Moreover, in esoteric practices, special emphases are placed on the arrangement of the altar and use of mandalas. The four main classes of mandalas used in esoteric practices are (1) the maha-mandalas, representing the Buddha statue or image, (2) the Dharma or seed mandalas, representing the seed syllables of the mantras as embodiment of sutra texts, (3) the samaya mandalas, representing the instruments and mudras used in the ceremonial practices, and (4) karma mandalas, representing the descriptions or expressions of actions and accomplishments of of the Buddha having the function of cause and effect. All of such mandalas are used in association with mudras, mantras, and Dharma texts, forming the ‘triple dharma seals of one reality’ by uniting the body, speech, and mind. A practitioner is thus able to enter the state of the Dharmakaya.

V. M. Sakya Longyen
Huayen on Indra’s Net
mahavaipulya@groups.facebook.com

禅是禅非


禅是禅非


禅是禅非
山人山中坐
是非头顶堕
俗人家里修
是非没法躲
饱坐易昏沉
饿修忌掉举
依止善知识
行坐息息存


The hermit meditates in the mountains
Gossips will fall from the heavens
The common folks practice at home
Into the gossip webs are they trapped

They will feel drowsy when they are full
They will feel restless when they are hungry
Find themselves the right guru and
Every breath of every act will be in Samadhi

Hymn for Offering Incense 上香偈


Vairocana Buddha

May this sacred cloud of incense
Pervade throughout the ten quarters
Making offerings to the Triple Gem
Deva and Dragon Dharma Protectors
Perfuming the hearts of sentient beings
So they realize the Wisdom of the Buddha!


愿此香云
普遍十方
供养三宝
护法龙天
普薰众生
同入佛智

A State or Act of Contemplation


‘Kuan’ is both a State and an Act of Contemplation

The word ‘kuan’ as used in Chinese Ch’an practice and in esoteric practice carries different meanings respectively.

In Ch’an practices, it is a noun, meaning a realized state of contemplation manifested after a practitioner has eliminated all his illusions through the practice of vipassana or Ch’an. Such a state can be manifested as heterodox or orthodox, or as imperfect or perfect. The practitioner must then follow the guidance of his guru, carefully compare his realized state with what is written and taught in the sutras, and adhere to what is orthodox and perfect so as to enter the state of samadhi in real life.

In esoteric practices, however, the word ‘kuan’ refers to an act of immersing oneself in a physical and mental state so as to achieve contemplated reality. The practitioner puts himself in real life situations to carry out such an acts of contemplation according to esoterics. Thus esoteric Buddhism emphasizes ‘kuan’, both in action and at rest.

Moreover, in esoteric practices, special emphases are placed on the arrangement of the altar and use of mandalas. The four main classes of mandalas used in esoteric practices are (1) the maha-mandalas, representing the Buddha statue or image, (2) the Dharma or seed mandalas, representing the seed syllables of the mantras as embodiment of sutra texts, (3) the samaya mandalas, representing the instruments and mudras used in the ceremonial practices, and (4) karma mandalas, representing the descriptions or expressions of actions and accomplishments of of the Buddha having the function of cause and effect. All of such mandalas are used in association with mudras, mantras, and Dharma texts, forming the ‘Triple Dharma Seals of the True Reality, ‘ ‘the One who has no second,’ ‘the Absolute Reality’ through the union of the ‘Three Vajras’ of  body, speech, and mind. A practitioner is thus able to enter the state of the Dharmakaya.

V. M. Sakya Longyen
Huayen on Indra’s Net
support@newhuayen.com

The OM Mantra and the Seven Levels of Consciousness


The OM Mantra and Mandukya Upanishad: Yoga Vedanta Meditation
A Transcript Study of  the Teachings of Swami Jnaneshvara Bharati on the OM Mantra

OM Mantra and the Seven Levels of Consciousness

The pinnacle of the wisdom of the ancient and practices of the ancient sages of yoga is contained in the terse 12 Verses of the Mandukya Upanishad, which outlines the philosophy and practices of the OM, It has been said that the juice of the Vedas is in the Upanishads, and the juice of the Upanishads is in the Mandukya Upanishad.

OM mantra is also suggested as a direct grab to Samadhi in the yoga sutras. The teachings of the Mandukya Upanishad are well worth deep study, discussion, reflection and contemplation. By faithfully and intently engaging these 12 verses, all of the other written and oral teachings can be explored as the foundation principles and practices encapsulated in this succinct summary. It is not only the most insightful writing, but also a complete outline for Sadhana enlightenment practices.

The OM mantra is the road map of the entire process of Sadhana and the most practical tool for self-realization. One of the other hundred plus Upanishads, the Mukti (or Liberation) Upanishad, explains that for those who are seeking Liberation, the understanding and practicing of the principles of the Mandukya Upanishad is sufficient for attaining that realization.

Verses 1 to 2 describe the Self and the Absolute. Verses 3-7 explain the four-levels of consciousness. Verses 8-12 outline the four aspects of AUM mantra. Briefly the 12 Verses are: 1. All is OM; 2. Self – Atman – Brahman; 3. Waking state – Vaishvanara; 4. Dreaming – Taijasa; 5. Deep Sleep – Prajna; 6. Experiencer of the three; 7. Fourth state – Turiya; 8. A, U, and M of OM mantra; 9. A of AUM; 10. U of AUM; 11. M of AUM; 12 Silence after AUM.

Verses 1-2 are about the Self and the Absolute.

Verse 1: All is OM. The whole universe is the syllable OM/AUM. Following is the exposition of OM. Everything that was, is, or will be is in truth OM. All else which transcends time, space, and causation is also OM.

Verse 2: Atman has 4 aspects. 1) Gross | Physical Plane; 2) Subtle | Astral Plane; 3) Causal Plane/Source; 4) Fourth/Consciousness. All of these, everywhere is in truth Brahman, the Absolute Reality. Verse 2: The Individual Self itself (Atman) is also Brahman (the Absolute Reality) This Atman or Self  has4 aspects through which it operates.

Verses 3-7 are on the four levels of consciousness.

Verse 3: First is Waking or Gross – the first aspect of Atman is the Self in the waking state/Vaishvanara. In this state, consciousness is turned outward to the external world. Through its 7 instruments and 19 channels, it experiences the gross objects of the phenomenal world. Briefly those 7 instrument are Space, Air, Fire, Water, and Earth, along with the Individuation from the whole, and the flow of Energy. The individual operates the 19 channels (as explained in Verse 2), which are the 4 functions of mind: Manas (sensory, processing mind), Chitta (storage of impressions), Ahamkara (I-maker or ego), and Buddhi (intelligence; knows, decides, judges, discriminates). These four functions operate through 5 Pranas: 1) Prana (heart, vitalizing, inhaling); Apana (base of torso, eliminating); Samana (naval, digestion, discernment); Udana (throat; exhalation); Vyana (whole body; coordinate systems). The 5 active senses or Indriyas, Karmendriyas of eliminating, procreating, moving, grasping, and speaking, and the 5 cognitive senses or Jnanendriyas of smelling, tasting, seeing, touching and hearing.

Verse 4: The second aspect of Atman is the Self in a Dreaming state/Taijasa. In the second state, consciousness is turned towards the inner world. It also operates through 7 instruments and 19 channels, which engage the subtle objects of the mental realm.

Verse 5: Third state is Deep Sleep/Causal/Prajna. The third aspect of Atman is the Self operating in the Deep Sleep state. In this third state, there is neither the desire for any growth or subtle object, nor any dream sequences. In Deep Sleep, all such experiences have receded or merged into the ground of undifferentiated consciousness. Here one is filled with the experience of Bliss, and can also find the way to clearer knowledge of the 2 preceding stage.

Verse 6: Find the Experiencer, the one who experiences all of these states of consciousness is the omniscient, in-dwelling source, and director of all. This one is the womb out of which all of the other emerges, all things originate from, and dissolve back into this source.

Verse 7: The fourth aspect of Atman or Self is Turiya, literally the 4th. In this 4th state, consciousness is neither turned outward, nor inward, nor is it both outward and inward. It is beyond both cognition and the absence of cognition. This 4th state of Turiya cannot be experienced through the senses, or known by comparison, deductive reason, or inference. It is indescribable, incomprehensible, and unthinkable with the mind. This is Pure Consciousness itself. This is the Real Self (Atman). It is within the cessation of all phenomena. It is serene, tranquil, filled with Bliss, and is One without a second. This is the Real or True Self that is to be Realized.

Verses 8-12 are the 4 aspects of AUM.

Verse 8: Those 4 levels of consciousness are the same, with the A, U, M, and Silence. The OM, though described as having 4 states, is indivisible. It is Pure Consciousness itself. That Consciousness is OM. The 3 sound A, U, M, and the 3 letter A, U, M, are identical with the 3 states of waking, dreaming, and sleeping, and these states are identical with the 3 sounds and letters. The 4th state, Turiya, is only to be Realized in the Silence behind, or beyond the other 3.

Verse 9: The sound A is waking/gross. Vaishvanara is the consciousness experienced during the waking state, and is “A” sound, or A, the 1st letter of AUM. That simple sound of A first and permeates all other sounds. One who is aware this level of reality has fulfillment of all longings and is successful.

Verse 10: The sound “U” is dreaming, subtle. Taijasa is the consciousness experienced during the dreaming state, and is “U”, the 2nd letter of AUM. This intermediate state operates between the waking and sleeping state, reflecting some qualities of the other 2. One who knows this subtler state is superior to others, for one who knows this, knowers of Brahman, the Absolute Reality, will be born into his or her family.

Verse 11: The sound “M” is deep sleep/causal. Prajna is the consciousness experienced during the state of dreamless deep sleep, and is “M”, or M, the 3rd letter of AUM. It contains the other 2, and is that from which the other 2 emerge, and into which they recede, or merge. A knower of this more subtle state can understand all that is within himself or herself.

Verse 12: The Silence after the AUM is the True Self/Soundless. The 4th aspect is the Soundless aspect of AUM. It is not utterable, and is not comprehended through the senses, or by the mind. Withe cessation of all phenomena, even of Bliss, this Soundless aspect becomes known. It is the state of Non-duality (Advaita) Reality, One without a second. This 4th state, Turiya, is the Real Self, or True Self. One with direct experience of this extends to Universal Consciousness. OM… OM… OM… OM…OM… OM… OM… OM… OM… OM… OM.

A Transcript Study of the Teachings of Swami Jnaneshvara Bharati on the OM Mantra
Read Further on OM Mantra and Seven Levels of Consciousness

V. M. Sakya Longyen
Huayen on Indra’s Net
support@newhuayen.com